Testing is not for the Shy

I recently joined the Test Design Exploration team.  This is one of many groups within our enterprise available to mentor testers.  Our charter is to explore test design techniques, provide opportunities to use them, and discuss how techniques might be used in projects.  We establish a schedule of test design topics and testers sign up to attend sessions.  For example, we’ll be exploring All Pairs in an upcoming session.

Our team has been meeting regularly to prepare the sessions and set up a schedule.  I like our group – they are very experienced and bring some fresh ideas to our topics.  Recently, we provided a status update and some clarifications around our scheduled start date.  With the business complete, someone suggested that our team create a SharePoint site where testers might ask questions of our team should they be to shy to ask during a session. I liked the idea of having a place to follow up from our sessions.  Accessible to everyone, it makes our team more transparent, and I think we are willing to support it.  What stuck with me was the description of a tester to shy to ask a question.

When I started as a developer in this organization a while back, the fact that there was a whole group of people dedicated to testing was new to me.  I thought it was pretty cool!  But I rarely saw them during a project and heard from them even less.  When I moved to a testing job family, I tended to be very vocal.  Actually, it might have been called pushy or obnoxious.  But with a lot of feedback and practice, I found a testing voice that is more collaborative.  I also learned that testing demands more of a presence from a tester. I suggested to my test design teammates that we should encourage testers to ask questions.  The sessions are a safe place to do this, asking questions in a group gives them great practice and confidence, and maybe we can deliver more than test design mentoring.  They all agreed.

Testing is not for the shy.  There are developers that will push you around with very technical language, dispute defects, question the credibility of your tests, or just ignore you.  There are project managers that will pressure you to reduce testing.  In my opinion, this is not the identity of a tester.  Take back your identity!

You are a tester and quite capable of

  • Learning C#, Java, or any other language
  • Defending your defects both at a technical level and, more importantly, at a business level
  • Establishing credibility through early collaboration and shared goals
  • Being a contributing member of any project team
  • Expressing the risks of reduced testing

I’m looking forward to exploring test design with testers in my organization.  But I think they can learn more by asking questions in the sessions or anywhere they go.  The bigger challenge for me is encouraging them to believe in their capabilities, and to have them respectfully act on the behalf of the quality in the products they evaluate.

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